AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 29, 2016
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, Heather Flewelling, and Christina Thomas

This week's issues:

1. An ongoing act of creation - Professional Organizations & Policy

2. The Nashville Recommendations for Inclusive Astronomy

3. What happened to women in computer science?

4. Kids Benefit From Having a Working Mom

5. Nominations Solicited for the 2017 Lecar Prize

6. Job Opportunities

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues

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1. An ongoing act of creation - Professional Organizations & Policy

From: Sarah Tuttle via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com  

Today I'd like to explore a question - What are professional societies for? I'm
hoping this anecdote from a meeting I recently attended will help you
interrogate your place in our professional societies - Who do we pay money to?
Where does it go? What do you hope to get out of a group for yourself, your
students, your colleagues? What role do our societies play in our larger world? 

I recently attended the SPIE (Society for Professional Industrial Engineers)
Astronomical Instrumentation conference. SPIE Astro draws astronomers, but also
engineers of all stripes (mechanical, optical, electrical, software, systems)
from all career stages. There are a variety of tracks including observatory
management, and those focusing on all varieties of earth and ground based
facilities, as well as the technology that enables them.

It also an incredibly homogenous conference. I'm going to be honest, it is
particularly oppressive. There is often 5-10% women in the room at any given
time. Although an international conference, it is heavily Western European
especially in the visible roles. It is very white. It is exhausting.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/07/an-ongoing-act-of-creation-professional.html

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2. The Nashville Recommendations for Inclusive Astronomy

From: Jessica Mink via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com  

In June 2015, 160 astronomers, sociologists, policy makers and community leaders
convened the first Inclusive Astronomy meeting at Vanderbilt University, in
Nashville, TN. The goal of this meeting was to discuss the issues affecting
people of color; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, genderqueer/genderfluid,
agender, intersex, queer, questioning, or asexual (LGBTIQA*) people; people with
disabilities; women; people disenfranchised by their socio-economic status; and
everyone who holds more than one of these underrepresented identities in the
astronomical community. A key focus of this meeting was examination of issues of
intersectionality: the well-established conceptualization that racism, sexism,
heterosexism, transphobia, and ableism are often linked (e.g., that women of
color are faced with the intersection of racism and sexism). Here is a summary
of the final version which the AAS Council has endorsed.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/07/the-nashville-recommendations-for.html

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3. What happened to women in computer science?

From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

by Johanna Dahlroos

In the mid-1980s, while the number of women entering medicine, law and physical
science studies began to accelerate, the number of women entering computer
science began to fall dramatically. This infographic asks why and looks at the
impact that shift has had on modern day software development.

http://blog.honeypot.io/what-happened-to-women-in-computer-science-infographic

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4. Kids Benefit From Having a Working Mom

From: Kevin Marvel [kevin.marvel_at_aas.org]

by Carmen Nobel 

Here's some heartening news for working mothers worried about the future of
their children.

Women whose moms worked outside the home are more likely to have jobs
themselves, are more likely to hold supervisory responsibility at those jobs,
and earn higher wages than women whose mothers stayed home full time, according
to a new study. Men raised by working mothers are more likely to contribute to
household chores and spend more time caring for family members.

The findings are stark, and they hold true across 24 countries.

Read more at

http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/kids-benefit-from-having-a-working-mom

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5. Nominations Solicited for the 2017 Lecar Prize

From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

The Lecar Prize selection committee is soliciting nominations for future
recipients of the Lecar Prize. Nominations should be in the form of a simple,
brief letter, preferably sent by email to Matthew Holman. There is no
restriction on the age of the recipient, though the award will not be given
posthumously. Nominations received by 1 September 2016 will be considered for
the 2017 Lecar Prize and will be valid for five years.

The Lecar Prize was endowed by a generous gift from the estate of Myron S. Lecar
to encourage and recognize exceptional contributions to the study of extrasolar
planets in particular and theoretical astrophysics in general. The recipient
receives an honorarium and delivers a lecture at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center
for Astrophysics. 

Find further information here

https://aas.org/posts/opportunity/2016/07/nominations-solicited-2017-lecar-prize

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6. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: 
diversity.html#howtoincrease
 
- Postdoctoral Position Reaction Dynamics & Planetary Sciences, University of
Hawaii at Manoa, USA
http://www.higp.hawaii.edu/~gillis/Kaiser-postdoc/postdocad.pdf

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to
topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org  

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email
address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

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9. Access to Past Issues

AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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